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Fellwood redevelopment project in Historic Savannah November 17, 2009

Filed under: Site Design — sustainphas @ 7:31 pm
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  • A fifty million redevelopment project is underway in Savannah, Georgia.  The development, Fellwood, is a major part of the Westside Development and Revitalization plan.  It broke ground in September 2008.  Fellwood is a project which aims to demonstrate that highly efficient and healthy buildings can be built affordably.  The project will include a four acre park and a community garden.  Preserving the local oak tree canopy will be another important step.  The development team is taking steps to reduce stormwater run off and utilize native landscaping.  Energy Star appliances, reflective roofs, and high efficiency windows are all included in the plans.  The project will be registered with the EarthCraft Coastal Communities certification, and it is a pilot LEED – ND neighborhood.  It is developed using the principles of smart growth for walkable and diverse communities. 

Source: http://www.surmag.com/index2.php?option=com_content&do_pdf=1&id=37

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Seattle’s High Point redevelopment project

Filed under: Healthy Housing — sustainphas @ 7:29 pm
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  • The Seattle Housing Authority owns 5,200 units of public housing.  When redeveloping High Point, the Housing Authority focused on creating a pedestrian friendly community based upon new urbanism ideals.  It features a natural drainage system, water conservation and energy efficiency innovations.  Furthermore, it features “Breath Easy Homes” to address the needs of children with asthma and allergies.  Seattle also undertook an independent cost-benefit analysis of the High Point project.  The study compared High Point to other local public housing.  It demonstrated that the utility costs for the development were 56% lower, and the fuel consumption was 37% lower. 

Source:  http://www.cityofseattle.net/dpd/cms/groups/pan/@pan/@sustainableblding/documents/web_informational/dpds_007254.pdf

Cost Benefit Analysis Study can be downloaded from the Seattle Housing Authority:

http://www.seattlehousing.org/news/pdf/High_Point_Energy_Study.pdf